Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Neighbor Reminds Dog Walkers To Put Waste Into The Garbage



The Laurelhurst Blog received this information:
It has come to my attention from my builder that dog walkers often toss their pet waste bags over the fence into my home construction area on Surber Drive. I was surprised at this practice by Laurelhurst dog walkers althoygh my builder said it happens everywhere.  
Workers often step on this tracking it into sensitive areas.  These residential construction sites are not dumpsters. Often there is one person cleaning up into garbage cans. Just like a home owner. Why would someone toss dog waste into someone’s yard?  Remember, a home construction site is someone’s yard and no one is patrolling around cleaning up your dog waste. 

The Laurelhurst Blog regularly receives other comments regarding neighbors not picking up after their dogs on the streets and in the park such as:
Please remember to only use the waste cans that are either yours or ones furnished by the City. The waste cans at the bus stops are not to be used for the disposal of  dog waste.  Notices have been placed on the Metro waste cans to not use them for pet waste.
There seems to be an increase of dog owners not picking up waste in the neighborhood and also on the paths in the park.  We regularly pick up other dogs' feces each time we see it.  It is our expectation, and per Seattle City law, that dog owners pick up after their pets, no exceptions. 
Please be courteous and clean up after your pet. We have a great neighborhood to take walks and children to play.  Let's all do our part in keeping our neighborhood a pleasant environment for all of us. 
We have lived in this area for over three decades  and are noticing more and more that people are not scooping up after their dogs. We have stepped in it several times in the lawn in front of our house. Please pick up after your dog.  

Seattle Public Utilities reports on their website: 

We have more than 125,000 dogs and 60,000 outdoor cats in Seattle. That amounts to about 50,000 lbs of pet waste every day.

Left on streets, curb strips and in yards and parks, pet waste can be carried by rainwater to storm drains and into our creeks, lakes and Puget Sound without treatment. It is one of the leading causes of bacterial contamination in our streams and causes other water quality problems just like livestock manure and fertilizer. 


There are bacteria and micro-organisms in pet waste such as Roundworms, E. coli, and Giardia that can make people sick if they’re ingested. Some can last in your yard for as long as four years if not cleaned up.  
Children who play outside and adults who garden are at greatest risk of infection. If pet waste is washed into the storm drain it ends up in lakes, streams or marine water, and people can accidentally swallow bacteria and other disease-causing organisms while swimming or playing in the water. These bacteria also end up in shellfish, and can make the people who eat them very sick. 
Put pet waste in a plastic bag, seal it, and throw it in the garbage- not in the yard waste! There are also Mutt Mitt (pdf) dispensers located around the City. The next time you're out walking your pet, take advantage of this free resource to help keep our waterways clean. 

There are laws in Seattle to protect our health and our environment which require pet waste to be picked up and disposed of properly.
Here are applicable Seattle City laws relating to Offenses of Safety and Sanitation:
  • $109 Allowing accumulation of feces SMC 9.25.082 (A)
  • $54 Not removing feces from another’s property SMC 9.25.0822 (B)
  • $54 Not having equipment to remove feces  SMC 9.25.082 (C)
  • $54 In Parks: Failure to carry equipment for removing feces OR failure to place feces in appropriate receptacle. SMC 18.12.080 (C)

Go here for more information.

Monday, August 3, 2020

Hospital Construction Activity This Week














Building Care, also called Forest B, of Phase 2 of Children's Hospital expansion is underway and the new building is planned to open in Spring of 2022.

The 310,000 square-foot addition will add an eight-story building and will includes diagnostic and treatment facilities, primarily out-patient cancer and others) labs, new state-of-the-art operating rooms, 20 inpatient beds, and a lobby. There will be two floors of underground parking and sterile processing. This will bring SCH bed total to 409, up from 200 before its expansion 2012 plan.

The helicopter landing pad moved temporarily to the roof of Forest A (176’), now known as Friends of Costco Building, Phase 1 of the expansion. The landing pad will be active until Building Care is completed. Noise is expected to be louder than the former ground-based helipad. When Forest B is complete, the helistop will moves to its permanent location on top of the Friends of Costco Building (same height).
Lights were added to the horizontal swing arm (boom) portion of the tower crane to increase safety for helicopter landings. These are in addition to the lights at the end of the boom and on the crane operator’s cab. The additional lights will help the helicopter pilots in identifying the location of the boom when landing or departing the helipad in the dark. While the lights are visible from the ground, they are not bright enough to interfere with any neighboring properties. As a reminder, the tower crane is scheduled to remain onsite through August 2020.

The Hospital posted this information on their Construction Blog about specific construction activity this week:

  • Pour concrete for walls and shafts
  • Install fireproofing
  • Framing
  • Paint
  • Set and weld exterior walls
  • Install roofing
  • Install glass
  • Install elevator equipment
  • Install mechanical and electrical wiring and plumbing equipment
  • Install drywall
  • Build out electrical, mechanical, generator and pneumatic tube blower rooms
  • Install insulation
  • Set air handling units
  • Install fire sprinkler systems
  • Install flooring
  • Install soil
  • Install irrigation
  • Build out interior spaces
  • Work in existing buildings:
    • Install utility wiring and pipes, frame doorway, install plywood, and paint on River B level 3 in old vending machine location
    • Paint, install ceiling panels, and install tile and stone in new chapel location on River A level 7
    • Set up infection prevention barrier, demolition, rough-in utility wiring, and install drywall in conference rooms on Forest A level 2
  • Building connection work:
    • Install ceiling panels, seal floors, and install utility wiring and pipes on lower level 1 of Forest A
    • Set up infection prevention barriers and begin demolition on level 4 of Forest A
    • Demolition and steel installation on level 5 of Forest A
    • Install steel and walls on level 6 of Forest A
    • Install walls and seismic joints on level 7 of Forest A
    • Install utility wiring, pipes, insulation, drywall and seismic joint covers on level 8 of Forest A
    • Form and pour curbs, frame and install drywall, install new roofing, and set up infection prevention barriers on level 9 of Forest A
  • Construction noise will be generated throughout the week. The soil installation and fireproofing will generate some odors. Expect heavy truck traffic, primarily for concrete and material deliveries.


All work will take place 8-6pm weekdays and 9-6pm on Saturdays. 

Friday, July 31, 2020

Former Building Of China Village (Uncle Lee's Now) Demolished Today








Demolition has started on the upcoming Aegis Living Assisted Living triangular site at Five Corners, which will include 135 units in a six story building (55-70 feet) with 53 parking stalls and 2500 square feet of retail on the first floor which would house a salon and cafe, according to the design proposal submitted in July 2016. First residents will move in around the fall of 2021.

Today the building that housed China Village for for over 30 years was demolished.

The Wong family have owned the restaurant since 1987.  In 2016 Amy and, her brother, Lee Wong bought out another family member and changed the name from "China Village" to "Uncle Lee's" and remodeled the restaurant.

Amy told the Laurelhurst Blog Staff at the time: "We started off as “China Village” and now we will continue our family business and passion as 'Uncle Lee’s'!"

China Village suddenly closed in October of 2018 leaving just a handwritten note on the door saying: "We are opening soon. Thank you for your patience as we are remodeling. Looking forward to see you in the New Year. Happy Holidays!"

In August of last year, Uncle Lee's relocated next to Katterman's at 5408 Sand Point Way NE. The restaurant had to move, along with other businesses in that area, due to the upcoming construction of Aegis Living.  Uncle Lee's can be reached on-line or by calling 206-523-0772.

Aegis will be demolishing the remainder of the buildings inside the fenced area over the next two weeks.

Jennifer, Director of Marketing, told the Laurelhurst Blog:
Abatement at the Aegis Living Laurelhurst site is complete as of July 31st and there are three buildings down. The remainder will come down over the next two weeks. After demolition is complete the site will be quiet for some time, unless we elect to do some early utility connections later this summer.






Thursday, July 30, 2020

All About Tsulos, The Small White Eaglet


Here is a recent post from the Union Bay Watch Blog published by Larry Hubbell, long-time local photographer and birder.


Out On A Limb

This July 9th, 2020 photo proves Tsuloss has begun branching.

It is hard to believe this small white eaglet, photographed on April 26th, is the same bird. She has probably replaced every feather on her body, gained close to ten pounds, increased her wingspan by close to six feet, and done it all in less than three months.

On July 3rd, Tsuloss was focused on feather cleaning and alignment. Her eaglet down appeared to be gone but her new feathers still needed to be aligned to maximize lift as she begins preparations for her first flight. 

Sadly, I am not certain of Tsuloss' gender. However, female Bald Eagles are usually larger than their mates. (This distinction is primarily useful when you see two adult birds side by side.) Nonetheless, Tsuloss' size is impressive. I am guessing, she is a female.

Possibly because of the weight difference, juvenile females are slower to develop than males. If we estimate Tsuloss was ten days old when first photographed, that would make her 92 days old as of July 17th. All About Birds estimates the nestling period is 56 to 98 days. This implies that Tsuloss should learn to fly within the next week. If you are planning a visit to see her in the nest - the sooner the better! 

The nest is located on the southeast corner of Montlake Cut. You do not need to worry about disturbing her. I suspect the nearby sewer replacement, highway construction, and the constant flow of boats through Montlake Cut has thoroughly acclimated her to humans and noise.

However, when it comes to taking her first flight she does seem to be behind schedule. Which might be another reason to assume she is female. Larger birds need extra time to reach their full size and potential. In this July 6th photo, she apparently just walked out on the easily accessed northern limb, attached at the same height as the nest.

On July 8th, she walked a bit further. When Monty returned to the nest, possibly with food, she did not fly (or even walk) over to investigate.

The parents no longer need to be constantly near the nest to protect her. Tsuloss' new feathers can handle the elements just fine.


Plus, with her fully-grown talons and bill, she could probably handle most predators as well. I suspect any predators capable of reaching the nest, will wish they hadn't.

I am often asked how to tell the difference between a young Bald Eagle and a Golden Eagle. One easy difference is that Golden Eagles have feathers covering their complete tarsus. In this photo, we can see the feathering near the lower portion of a Tsuloss' tarsus looks a lot like 'high-water' pants revealing an exposed ankle.

Also, as far as I know, Golden Eagles don't reside in cities.

On July 9th, as in our initial photo, we see Tsuloss spreading her wings. However, this appeared to be mostly a response to the wind and not a part of a consistent exercise regime.

As impressive as her wingspan and feather development is, she needs to be regularly working the wings to develop muscle strength. While I have not been at the nest around the clock, I still have not seen her flapping her wings with the expected consistency required to develop flight strength.

This July 11th photo, shows her still walking on the northern 'easy-access' branch.

On the positive side, when she reached the end of the flat portion of the branch she flew-hopped approximately two feet up onto the outer portion of the branch, where she could watch the boats passing through Montlake Cut.

This week, Tsuloss has finally taken the next step in the process. She has moved out to a westward pointing branch. I have watched her fly-hop from the branch back to the nest. She kind of scrambles into the nest, which may tend to pull it apart. Hopefully, her flight skills improve rapidly.

Earlier this week, after she returned to the nest she hurried out onto the northern branch. She was apparently trying to get a better look at Monty, who flew in and landed in a tree at the east end of the nesting grove. She was probably hoping for food delivery.

Now is an important time for all of us to be watching out for Tsuloss. At this point, if she leaves the nest I suspect at best she might glide to the ground. Even if she lands safely, I doubt she would have the strength to return to the nest. It is also possible she could easily be injured coming down. From what I have read, leaving the nest may be the most dangerous moment in an eagles life.

I would rather see her spend the next few weeks constantly flapping her wings and learning to move about in the nesting tree. 

Exploring the upper branches would give her multiple opportunities to practice short flights, precise landings, and functional takeoffs. Even though the branch to the west requires a small flight-hop, it is still at almost exactly the same height as the nest, and not enough of a challenge. I believe, she needs to work her way higher in the tree to properly develop her skills.

It also would not be surprising for her to remove some small branches and leaves, so she has room to extend her wings and practice. Over many more years, the Bald Eagles in Broadmoor have nearly denuded the tree above their nest. 

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Former Benton Jewelers Building Demolished Today




Benton Jewelers building demolished












Demolition has started on the upcoming Aegis Living Assisted Living triangular site at Five Corners, which will include 135 units in a six story building (55-70 feet) with 53 parking stalls and 2500 square feet of retail on the first floor which would house a salon and cafe, according to the design proposal submitted in July 2016.

The landmark Benton clock that has stood in front of Benton Jewelers since 1986 which then became Edward Jones (3615 NE 45th Street) next to the location where China Village used to be, was taken down last month and put into storage.

The cost to move and store the clock is $30,000.   

Jennifer, Director of Marketing, with Aegis Living, told the Laurelhurst Blog:

The clock was removed over 3 days, (5/20-22) by a professional clock restoration service, Tick Tock Tony.  The clock was not currently in working condition, although the good news is it has all of its parts.  The clock will be restored to working order and retrofitted with LED backlighting (it was not working when it was taken down), stored for the duration of construction, and replaced in a prominent position visible to the 5 corners intersection upon building opening, when building construction is complete.  
The new location will be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Board. Options include placing it on the corner of Ne Street and NE 45th Place, or in the large new courtyard which will face NE 45th Street. 
The street clock, associated with Benton Jeweler’s, originally stood at the first jeweler's locations on University Way from 1911 to 1986. It was then moved to its current location when Benton moved to that new location. Benton’s Jeweler’s closed in 2008 just short of their 100th anniversary. 
Aegis bought the clock from the Benton family. The clock is one of only nine street clocks left in the City of Seattle, and all are designated as City landmarks. At one time Seattle had over 50 such clocks.  

Prior to removing the clock, Aegis received approval from the Landmarks Preservation Board.  The clock was transported and will be stored by Artech, which is licensed and bonded to transport and store large art pieces and specialty objects.


Aegis will be demolishing all the buildings inside the fenced area which include 3200 and 3232 NE 45th Street and 3215 NE 45th Place. The demolition of the five buildings will take about one month. Recently a salvage/recyclable truck has been at the site removing items in each buildings, removing items to be diverted from landfills with separate waste streams by the demolition contractor.

Demolition trucks and equipment will stage on private property and traffic disruptions should be minimal. No lane obstructions are anticipated during demolition, however there will be some disconnects of existing utilities and installation of new upgraded utility infrastructure for the project and area that will occur in the right of way and are being scheduled around heavy traffic times and in some cases overnight. Flaggers will be present during construction phases that require lane obstruction. This will be intermittent throughout construction.

Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Former Baskin-Robbins Demolished Today





Demolition has started on the upcoming Aegis Living Assisted Living triangular site at Five Corners, which will include 135 units in a six story building (55-70 feet) with 53 parking stalls and 2500 square feet of retail on the first floor which would house a salon and cafe, according to the design proposal submitted in July 2016.

Today, former Baskin-Robbins building was demolished. The popular ice-cream store stood at that location for over four decades and was forced to close in September of 2015.

The manager of Baskin-Robbins who owns that franchise location told the Laurelhurst Blog Staff at the time that "unfortunately, we were unable to reach an agreement regarding a lease on the site with the Broderick Group, a real-estate brokerage company, so Baskin-Robbins is forced to close.

He said that the new landlord "wanted to raise the rent by more than 50% with all costs included."
 
He added: 
I countered and it was not accepted.  But the more important issue is that they couldn't not give us the long term lease, so we couldn't accept their terms knowing that the minimum wage will rise along with franchise fee and everything else. They were very firm on not renewing us long term. And we couldn't decide to run for just an extra year only to be told to vacate, not to mention at a much higher rent, etc.

The franchisee and his family had owned the store for 15 years and the store has been at that location for 40 years.

The franchisee manager told the Laurelhurst Blog staff an interesting story of how his family came from Korea, saving up money to buy the store:

It was around December 1996 time when Seattle was experiencing one of the worst snow storms in its history when my family arrived at Sea Tac airport from Korea. I was only in 9th grade, and my parents gave up everything they had in Korea, promising career, friends, family, etc to bring my family over to America for the better future of their next generation. 
So my second chapter in life started in America and Baskin Robbins was there from the beginning. Thanks to my parents' sacrifice, I ended up going to MIT and my brother is now an oral surgeon trained in Ivy league school in New York. I've been always grateful for what this country provided for my family and what my parents did for us.  
So it's really sad that 40 years of history is now going to be gone along with 15 years of my family history at the site. Unfortunately, with the rising utility costs, payroll costs, rents, and everything else, it has become increasing more difficult each year to maintain the store.  
But we still wanted to continue operating as we have invested a lot of money into the store in the past decade+. But without a commitment from the landlord for the site, we can only do so much.  
The Baskin Robbins Store has been on the premise for over 40 years, and it's the oldest store in Washington state, and it's been with my family for over 15 years now, and we are extremely saddened by this event, and I would like to express my apologies for being unable to continue to serve the community.  
The store was my family's American dream, and it provided so many memories. It's quite sad to let it go like this.  
So with all this being said, we are closing on September 27 as the last day. And we will vacate by the end of the month.

The property then sat vacant for several years and had a couple of random stores which neighbors report never had any business and closed suddenly then sat vacant again for about another year.

Aegis will be demolishing all the buildings inside the fenced area which include 3200 and 3232 NE 45th Street and 3215 NE 45th Place. The demolition of the five buildings will take about one month. Recently a salvage/recyclable truck has been at the site removing items in each buildings, removing items to be diverted from landfills with separate waste streams by the demolition contractor.

Demolition trucks and equipment will stage on private property and traffic disruptions should be minimal. No lane obstructions are anticipated during demolition, however there will be some disconnects of existing utilities and installation of new upgraded utility infrastructure for the project and area that will occur in the right of way and are being scheduled around heavy traffic times and in some cases overnight. Flaggers will be present during construction phases that require lane obstruction. This will be intermittent throughout construction.

Last month, the landmark Benton clock was removed that stood in front of Benton Jewelers since 1986 which then became Edward Jones (3615 NE 45th Street) next to the location where China Village used to be, was recently taken down and put into storage. The cost to move and store the clock is $30,000. The new location will be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Board. Options include placing it on the corner of Ne Street and NE 45th Place, or in the large new courtyard which will face NE 45th Street.

Another retirement home, Empress Senior Living, has broken ground across at 4020 NE 55th Street, where the Hawthorne Hills Veterinary Hospital was currently located and since been demolished, across the street from Metropolitan Market. The proposal, Permit #3025827, includes 3 stories of approximately 74 units with a restaurant at street level and parking for approximately 30 vehicl
es above and below grade.

Monday, July 27, 2020

Hospital Construction Activity This Week










Building Care, also called Forest B, of Phase 2 of Children's Hospital expansion is underway and the new building is planned to open in Spring of 2022.

The 310,000 square-foot addition will add an eight-story building and will includes diagnostic and treatment facilities, primarily out-patient cancer and others) labs, new state-of-the-art operating rooms, 20 inpatient beds, and a lobby. There will be two floors of underground parking and sterile processing. This will bring SCH bed total to 409, up from 200 before its expansion 2012 plan.

The helicopter landing pad moved temporarily to the roof of Forest A (176’), now known as Friends of Costco Building, Phase 1 of the expansion. The landing pad will be active until Building Care is completed. Noise is expected to be louder than the former ground-based helipad. When Forest B is complete, the helistop will moves to its permanent location on top of the Friends of Costco Building (same height).
Lights were added to the horizontal swing arm (boom) portion of the tower crane to increase safety for helicopter landings. These are in addition to the lights at the end of the boom and on the crane operator’s cab. The additional lights will help the helicopter pilots in identifying the location of the boom when landing or departing the helipad in the dark. While the lights are visible from the ground, they are not bright enough to interfere with any neighboring properties. As a reminder, the tower crane is scheduled to remain onsite through August 2020.

The Hospital posted this information on their Construction Blog about specific construction activity this week:

  • Pour concrete for walls and shafts
  • Install fireproofing
  • Framing
  • Paint
  • Set and weld exterior walls
  • Install roofing
  • Install glass
  • Install mechanical and electrical wiring and plumbing equipment
  • Install drywall
  • Build out electrical, mechanical, generator and pneumatic tube blower rooms
  • Install insulation
  • Install pneumatic tube system stations
  • Install fire sprinkler systems
  • Install flooring
  • Install soil
  • Build out interior spaces
  • Work in existing buildings: demolish flooring and drywall, saw cut floor, install drain, install utility wiring and pipes, and install drywall on River B level 3 in old vending machine location; paint and install ceiling panels in new chapel on River A level 7
  • Building connection work: paint, install ceiling panels, and install utility wiring and pipes on lower level 1 of Forest A; set up infection prevention barriers and begin demolition on level 5 of Forest A; demolition and steel installation on level 6 of Forest A; install steel and walls on level 7 of Forest A; install utility wiring and pipes on level 8 of Forest A; frame and install drywall, demolish existing roofing, install new roofing, and set roof drains on level 9 of Forest A
  • Construction noise will be generated throughout the week. The soil installation will generate some odors. Expect heavy truck traffic, primarily for concrete and material deliveries. Construction activity is weather-dependent and subject to change based on conditions.


All work will take place 8-6pm weekdays and 9-6pm on Saturdays.